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Public Program | Digital Art Project(ed): Insight into Digital Installations at The Crocker + SJMA [Live Online]

Wed, Jun 10, 2pm PST | Free; online registration required.

Join Matt Isble, Director of Exhibition Design at the Crocker Art Museum and founder of MuseumTrade.org, and Richard J. Karson, Director of Design and Operations at the San José Museum of Art (SJMA), for an insider’s perspective on the process of making visible the invisible in digital art installations. Artwork from Bill Viola, Mark Hansen + Ben Rubin, and Alan Rath currently on view at the Crocker and at SJMA will be discussed among other time-based media artwork.
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A Visual Diary of Cross-Country Collaboration

Watch this visual diary of the cross-country collaboration between the San José Museum of Art and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, featuring the exhibition Rina Banerjee: Make Me a Summary of the World.
Video created by Richard J. Karson, Director of Design + Operations.
SJMA is More than a Building, We are a Community

On behalf of Oshman Executive Director S. Sayre Batton, the staff, and Board of Trustees at SJMA, we thank our amazing volunteers for their amazing generosity and many years of service. We miss you all and look forward to reuniting at the Museum soon! Watch a short video HERE.
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Discover How Exhibitions are Made with SJMA’s Director of Design + Operations

SJMA’s Director of Design and Operations Richard J. Karson gives us an inside look into what goes into making an exhibition: design, planning, and collaboration. Karson pays special attention to the cross-country collaboration of Rina Banerjee: Make Me a Summary of the World, which was co-curated with Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA).
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Video: Gallery Talk | Sonya Rapoport: biorhythm [Online]

SJMA assistant curator Kathryn Wade held a gallery chat online and was joined by two Rapoport scholars Terri Cohn and Alla Efimova. This event was originally scheduled to be held on-site, in the gallery, but shifted online due to the City's shelter in place ordinance. It was held on April 30, 2020 from each speaker's respective homes.
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#MuseumFromHome with San José Museum of Art

Discover how art can help Silicon Valley residents engage creatively and with one another during Shelter in Place. Join the Education team at San Jose Museum of Art for a series of related art activities shared in this video, all of which can be done with items found around your house!
#SJMAEd | #ArtAtHome | #SiliconValleyStrong
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11th Annual Poetry Invitational [online]

In honor of National Poetry Month, Bay Area poets created new works inspired by art in the San José Museum of Art’s permanent collection. Hosted by Janice Lobo Sapigao the Poet Laureate of Santa Clara County and co-sponsored by Poetry Center San José. Originally slated to occur in real time, on the Third Thursday of April, the event was moved to online, and was pre-recorded. Read the poems HERE.

Featured poets: Mighty Mike McGee, Janice Lobo Sapigao, and Eileen Hernandez-Cuellar recorded their poetry in their respective homes.

Works of art that inspired the poetry: Don’t Let the Boys Win, 2003 by Lara Schnitger; Improvised Garden II (Water Street), 2017 by Robert Minervini; and Wall, Tierra Del Sol, California, 2015 by Richard Misrach will be featured in the upcoming exhibition South East North West.
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Behind the Scenes Video | Andy Goldsworthy’s Burnt Patch Installation

Andy Goldsworthy created a site-specific installation for his exhibition, Breath of Earth, at SJMA in 1995. Burnt Patch required three full days to install by three people. The pine sticks used are from a specific area of the Sierra Mountains near South Lake Tahoe, called Fallen Leaf Lake. SJMA Director of Design + Operations Richard J. Karson went with Goldsworthy and learned the artist's process. Branches were snapped off trees with a park ranger’s approval. The center blackened sticks were burnt by Goldsworthy and Karson at SJSU’s outdoor foundry. Karson keeps a blowtorch on hand when he installs the piece to re-char some branches as they are placed in the center. Each time Burnt Patch is installed, branches need to be snapped to fit a particular section. When the larger branches run out, Karson goes to the mountains to collect aditional branches. When it rains, the sticks absorb the water and bend slightly as they dry. In this sense, the piece is alive.

This artist collected pieces of nature to create a sculpture, which was placed in the Museum’s outdoor sculpture court. People could then view the work from a distance, either from an outdoor balcony above, or through the glass windows. By using works collected from the mountains and that anyone could pick up or step on, but placing them in an environment that creates a barrier to touching them, Goldsworthy asks us to reexamine the value of these objects that what we break or burn in the woods.
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Do Ho Suh’s Karma Installation

The sculpture, on loan from an anonymous charitable foundation, was lifted into SJMA's Oshman Sculpture Court via San Fernando Street. 15 people were on-site to assist in its safe installation and to document this process.
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Installation Time-lapse | Sonya Rapoport

Sonya Rapoport: biorhythm was installed over the course of 10 days by 4 exhibition team members painting walls, creating displays, hanging art, and arranging lighting. This original exhibition was curated by Kathryn Wade, assistant curator, with gratitude to the Sonya Rapoport Legacy Trust.
Related exhibition: Sonya Rapoport: biorhythm
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Winding a Historic Clock
Do you know what time it is? Or even what day? Time seems to meld into itself these days, but at SJMA, we are watching the clock—the clock tower, that is!
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Another Look of the Clock Tower
San José’s historic clock, manufactured and installed by Danish clock-maker Nels Johnson himself in 1909, was originally part of the City’s first post office and library. The so-called Century Tower Clock was designed to last 100 years, hence the name, and it instantly became an iconic marker of downtown.

The clock has survived turbulent times for over one hundred years, including the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. Thanks to the Museum’s dedicated staff, who wind it weekly and care for its maintenance, the Century Tower Clock ticks on. We hope this symbol of San José’s enduring history provides a sense of comfort, solace, and continuing perseverance in the face of our current crisis.
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Video Teaser | Creative Minds: Tommie Smith and Glenn Kaino
With Drawn Arms: Glenn Kaino and Tommie Smith explores one man’s action to raise his fist for what he believed in. And the whole world was listening. Last month, as part of SJMA’s popular Creative Minds series, artist Glenn Kaino and Olympian Tommie Smith revisited the Museum to speak about that life-changing moment. View a special preview of the Creative Minds talk HERE.
Related exhibition: With Drawn Arms: Glenn Kaino and Tommie Smith
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