Around the Table, Stage One: Jitish Kallat: Epilogue

  • Image
    A photograph of a gallery space with 5 walls that each display 6 rows of hanging framed pictures that span from the floor to the ceiling.

    Jitish Kallat
    Epilogue, 2010–2011
    Pigment print on archival paper
    753 prints, 11 3/16 x 14 3/8 inches each
    Display dimensions variable

  • Image
    A photograph of four frames that contain 5 rows and 7 columns depicting the phases of the moon. Each frame is a different month. The background of the frames is black and the different phases of the moon are golden.

    Jitish Kallat
    Epilogue, 2010–2011 (detail)
    Pigment print on archival paper
    753 prints, 11 3/16 x 14 3/8 inches each
    Display dimensions variable
    Courtesy Jitish Kallat Studio.

[ Around the Table ]

Food punctuates daily life and shapes family traditions. It is a manifestation of commonality and culture. Your childhood may have been nurtured by food memories—of meals and mealtimes, of abundance or want, of family roles and rituals. We each may take our small comforts from Wonder Bread, roti, pita, tortillas, challah, injera, or bánh…. 

Our “daily bread” takes centerstage in the first installment of Around the Table, Jitish Kallat’s expansive installation Epilogue (2010 – 2011). Here, Kallat honors his late father through a deeply personal series of photographs of progressively eaten roti (the round, traditional South Asian flatbread). Each image represents one of the 22,000 moons that bore witness to his father’s 62-year lifespan. Epilogue is a metaphorical meditation on sustenance and time.

Kallat focuses on universal themes of birth, death, survivalwhat he calls the “endless narratives of human struggle.” He is based in Mumbai, and much of his work has been inspired by the chaotic urban streets he navigates daily. In Epilogue, however, he stepped back from the noise to pay respect to his father, with whom he undoubtedly shared many roti around the family table. Kallat reminds viewers of life’s natural ebb and flow and of the things that nourish us—bread, the staff of life; family; celestial rhythms. 

Visitors may remember Kallat’s work from SJMA’s 2011 exhibition Roots in the Air: Branches Below: Modern and Contemporary Art from India. His work is included in the collections of the National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi; The Art Institute of Chicago; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Singapore Art Museum; FAAM (Fukuoka Asian Art Museum), Japan; the Sigg Collection, Switzerland; and other institutions around the world.

Sponsors

Dipti and Rakesh Mathur